Paintings

Description of the painting by Ivan Aivazovsky “The Storm at Cape Ayia”


Year of creation - 1875, size - 215 by 325 cm, materials - canvas, oil. Located in the Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

Geographically, the cape is located in the south of Crimea, not far from the city of Balaklava, and is a rock wall with a length of about 13 km, while its highest mountain - Kokiya-Kiya - is not higher than 600 m. The artist depicted this picturesque piece of wildlife during a storm, which inexorably carries a large ship directly to a steep shore. Wind and surging waves roll the ship, promising terrible death to the crew. But several brave sailors decide to fight the elements and launch rowing boats, trying to escape on their own. The first one is shown in the foreground.

By the choice of colors and the special softness that fills the picture, despite the sad tie, it is likely that a hopeful dawn is coming. From the darker part of the canvas penetrated by the storm energy in the alarming lilac, violet and black-blue, the gradient smoothly transitions to lighter and calmer shades. It even seems that the first warm rays of the sun are falling on people and on everything around them. The sky clears up, the waves calm down a bit, which means that the chances of survival are seriously growing.

Aivazovsky is superb in color - his sea is heterogeneous and beautiful. On the one hand, it’s dangerous and cruel, on the other - it’s multifaceted and living as if by itself. The viewer sees all the transitions of shadow and light inside the water mountains and the snow-white foam at their tops, whose children - seagulls - break free and are not afraid to drown, unlike people. Given the degree of detail and the impressive size of the canvas, it should make a huge impression nearby - the emotional tension and foreboding of the approaching denouement captures and scares. The richness of shades and contrasts attracts the eye.





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Watch the video: Ivan Aivazovsky, Part 3. Virtual Musum Tour (September 2020).