Paintings

Description of the painting by Pablo Picasso “The death of the bullfighter”


Bullfighting has been a favorite sight of Pablo Picasso since childhood. He regularly came to the arena, where he saw not only the victories of the bullfighter, but also their complete defeats. The artist many times depicted bullfight in his paintings, but the most popular of them was the death of the bullfighter, written in the style of the author of surrealism, beloved by the author in 1933.

In the death picture of the bullfighter, the artist depicts at the same time a bull, who for him served as the personification of the male principle, and the horse - the female. If you look at the picture through the eyes of the author, we see that in these images there is an eternal clash of the sexes, the struggle of a man with a woman.

Next, we are faced with an alarming plot in which a huge bull drags on its powerful horns a merciless bullfighter, anticipating its approaching death. We see his face peeking out from under a red piece of cloth, in which Picasso left a mystery. If the bullfighter can defeat his horned rival, it will simply be his red cape, if the opposite happens, having a sad outcome, this red spot means blood flowing from the body of a dying person. Judging by the name of the picture, one needs to lean closer to the second option, however, knowing the unpredictability and originality of the artist’s thoughts, one can also find another secret meaning of this action.

Pablo Picasso often portrayed images of heroes with a dual meaning. Even in the death picture of the bullfighter, the bull is represented not only as a killer, but also as much a victim as the man he defeated. If you look closely, we see that on the face of the beast there is not at all a wild rage, but only an extraordinary surprise. The picture is saturated with the expression and motives of surrealism, which only true connoisseurs of the art of Pablo Picasso can fully understand.





Pictures of William Turner

Watch the video: express rising - capsize excerpt taken from Low End Theory Podcast #12 (September 2020).