Paintings

Description of Arkhip Kuindzhi's painting “Oaks” (1900-1905)


The canvas "Oaks" reflects the true Russian nature. It impresses with the details of the outlines and configurations. In the foreground, the canvases are a group of powerful trees, distinguished by the density of the crown and burdened with succulent impenetrable foliage. They merge into one pile, forming a weighty impressive contour. In front of them lies a dense shading. On a radiant horizon, weightless translucent clouds occasionally float.

On the canvas, the indisputably romantic worldview of nature.

The artist, with his characteristic insight and fidelity of vision, notices in it the exquisite differences in shades and amazingly skillfully presents them. This is evident in the reproduction of a weightless transparent sky, and in the radiant radiance that fills the clearing, and in fresh ant, whose halftones vary from light to dark green shades. On Kuindzhi's canvas, a compositional comparison with Shishkin's work “Oaks. Herd". But if in his brainchild Shishkin focuses on the details of the landscape, then Kuindzhi, on the contrary, synthesizes forms, creating an elaborate artistic metaphor.

Kuindzhi rushed in his works to the utmost generalizations in order to reveal the main thing, to convey the mood of the landscape. He was looking for a collective type of tree, and this selection led him to a kind of bulky, original image of a huge oak. So the artist seems to combine real earthly natural objects with celestial, unearthly. The foliage on the tops of the trees, resembling a cloud, looks grandiose, majestic. This gives the impression of luxury of stunning nature, saturated with life-giving drinks and embodied in the artist’s imagination into something divine, unearthly and important.

Powerful trees seemed to express the spirituality of Russia. They are the same centenarians, famous for their simplicity, beauty and strength. The blue of the sky, green fields, small trees and shrubs, slightly yellowed grass serve as real details, pointing to the summer. The landscape combines reality and allegory.





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